Satyajit Ray on Cinema

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Parash Pathar. A bank clerk discovers a stone that turns steel into gold in Ray's delightful foray into comedy, delightfully tweaking Calcutta middle-class mores like a Bengali Preston Sturges. Apur Sansar. Part three of Ray's Apu Trilogy finds Apu as an adult, and in love. The second film in Satyajit Ray's beloved Apu Trilogy follows Apu's family as they travel to the holy city of Benares along the banks of the Ganges.

Satyajit Ray on Cinema by Satyajit Ray

Ravi Shankar provides the score for Ray's debut film, a tale of a young boy in an impoverished Bengal village. The film won a special prize at Cannes: Best Human Document.


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Restored Print! A black comedy shot in the early days of Indira Gandhi's "emergency rule," The Middleman reveals a Calcutta of rampant unemployment, declining basic services, and politically inspired violence. Won Ray the West Bengal Oscar equivalents for best film, direction, and screenplay. A shrewd satire on the American-styled business world of Calcutta.

Ray weaves elements of folklore, classical and popular music, dance, and drama into this fairy tale in which two village boys set out on a host of uproarious adventures, and in the end are beautifully rewarded for their work for peace. Created amid the growing social unrest and political violence of India and the world post, The Adversary is Ray at his most openly political, yet also at his most compassionate.

Restored Prints! These two films were intended to screen as a double bill and show a side of Ray unknown to most: populist, funny, willing to try anything.

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Based on a Rabindranath Tagore novella, Charulata follows one woman's romantic and intellectual yearning in late nineteenth-century India. Ray's personal favorite of his works. Ray's first film in color is a tale of manners and mores played out amid a Himalayan landscape as dramatic as the conflicts on display.

Two essential Ray documentaries on his greatest influences: Rabindranath Tagore , on the Nobel Prize—winning poet and painter, and Sukumar Ray , on the director's father, a writer and critic. The great Bollywood superstar Waheeda Rehman stars in one of Ray's most atypical films, a commercially successful noir melodrama filled with taxi drivers, drug smugglers, and prostitutes that became the director's most popular film in his native Bengal. Ray sets his ironic and humorous eye on the plight of the Bengali middle class, caught amid the changing moralities of urban life.

Focusing in particular on the role of women in this metamorphosis, Ray tells a story that is both minutely particular to Calcutta and universally recognizable. In honor of the centenary of the writer Rabindranath Tagore's birth, Ray made this feature based on three Tagore stories. A teenage Sharmile Tagore delivers one of her most riveting performances in Ray's tale of faith and obsession, set in rural Bengal circa A wealthy landowner offers his beautiful daughter-in-law as an incarnation of the goddess Kali.

Goutam Ghose India, Noted Bengali filmmaker and documentarian Ghose was handpicked by Satyajit Ray's widow to create this moving eulogy and tribute to the great director, which acknowledges his influences and draws inspiration from Ray's original red notebook of sketches, first drafts, and musings.

Jean Renoir France, IB Technicolor Print! Based on a novel by the author of Black Narcissus , Renoir's wise, warm Technicolor masterpiece follows several young girls coming of age on the River Ganges. A young Satyajit Ray served as a location scout. Vittorio De Sica Italy, De Sica's masterpiece of a father and son searching the streets of Rome for their stolen bicycle is considered one of the greatest films ever made, and cited by Satyajit Ray as an inspiration.

Joi Baba Felunath. Introduced by Tipu Purkayastha.

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Ray's detective hero Feluda The Golden Fortress is back on the case, this time in the holy city of Benares! A wonder, both for Ray's take on pulp fiction and his images of the teeming byways of one of the world's most atmospheric and fascinating cities.


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Sonar Kella. A child who suffers from flashbacks to an ancient time journeys to Rajasthan in search of a fortress of gold and aided by the master detective Feluda! Ray's little-seen yet unforgettable combination of children's adventure tales and detective fiction is the master at his most entertaining, pulpiest best. With short, Two. Ashani Sanket. In this searing drama, Ray focuses on one of the twentieth century's greatest man-made disasters-the Bengali famine, where over five million people died.

This portrait of the remote Himalayan kingdom of Sikkim, nestled between Tibet and Nepal, is one of the most remarkable documentaries on Himalayan culture ever made. Imported Print!

A clearer view of overwhelming India and of Satyajit Ray

Ray's most overtly Renoir-ish film, and probably his masterpiece. Four young men from Calcutta spend a few days in the country, and their youthful arrogance gets them into a series of disastrous and often hilarious adventures. Parash Pathar. A bank clerk discovers a stone that turns steel into gold in Ray's delightful foray into comedy, delightfully tweaking Calcutta middle-class mores like a Bengali Preston Sturges.

Apur Sansar. Part three of Ray's Apu Trilogy finds Apu as an adult, and in love. The second film in Satyajit Ray's beloved Apu Trilogy follows Apu's family as they travel to the holy city of Benares along the banks of the Ganges. Ravi Shankar provides the score for Ray's debut film, a tale of a young boy in an impoverished Bengal village. The film won a special prize at Cannes: Best Human Document. Restored Print!

A black comedy shot in the early days of Indira Gandhi's "emergency rule," The Middleman reveals a Calcutta of rampant unemployment, declining basic services, and politically inspired violence.

Satyajit Ray

Won Ray the West Bengal Oscar equivalents for best film, direction, and screenplay. A shrewd satire on the American-styled business world of Calcutta. Ray weaves elements of folklore, classical and popular music, dance, and drama into this fairy tale in which two village boys set out on a host of uproarious adventures, and in the end are beautifully rewarded for their work for peace. Created amid the growing social unrest and political violence of India and the world post, The Adversary is Ray at his most openly political, yet also at his most compassionate.

Restored Prints! These two films were intended to screen as a double bill and show a side of Ray unknown to most: populist, funny, willing to try anything. Based on a Rabindranath Tagore novella, Charulata follows one woman's romantic and intellectual yearning in late nineteenth-century India. Ray's personal favorite of his works. Ray's first film in color is a tale of manners and mores played out amid a Himalayan landscape as dramatic as the conflicts on display.

Satyajit Ray's Nayak aka The Hero 1966 with english subtitles

Two essential Ray documentaries on his greatest influences: Rabindranath Tagore , on the Nobel Prize—winning poet and painter, and Sukumar Ray , on the director's father, a writer and critic. While his contempt for the mainstream audience and film makers who didn't care about the medium and its artistic merits, was never a What really strikes in these collection of essays and articles of Satyajit Ray, more than anything else is his deeply compassionate nature and humanism.

While his contempt for the mainstream audience and film makers who didn't care about the medium and its artistic merits, was never a secret, it does come out rather harshly in many of his essays here. I admit that I missed many of his filmy-references as I haven't seen a lot of films which he refers to, still it was an engaging read. Would definitely like to return to some portions once I complete watching his entire oeuvre. A great director, even greater human being. Jul 05, Farhana rated it it was amazing Shelves: cinema.

Jul 03, Mohit Somani rated it it was amazing. Ray, the finest of directors, is also a fine writer. Moreover, there is not a trace of delusion when he is talking about his own work. He knows what was wrong with his most famous of works, what people saw in them, why they are important. The realism of his movies is present in his writing also. Overall a great read for every person who enjoys good movies not necessarily art movies. A glimpse into a boundless mind The book containing scattered articles is a small glimpse into his thoughts on cinema.

His depth of study and vastness of knowledge can be inferred from these. Read it if u truly care about understanding cinema. Feb 26, Emil rated it it was amazing. It is always fascinating to read what the masters of cinema have to say. Anish Mukherjee rated it it was amazing May 03, Shalmoli rated it it was amazing Jan 19, Tapasmita Sengupta rated it it was amazing Mar 23, Subrata Bhattacharya rated it really liked it Nov 24, Shitiz Srivastava rated it it was amazing Jan 02, Rajesh Reddy rated it it was amazing Jun 06, Ritesh Agarwal rated it really liked it Jul 07, Ishan Bose rated it really liked it Feb 27, Rohan Parakkad rated it it was amazing Dec 13, Ashwini Chandrashekar rated it really liked it Nov 09, D S rated it really liked it Jun 06, Parna Ghosh rated it really liked it Jun 15, Nagel Hamsun rated it really liked it Jul 30, Rajan Raj rated it liked it May 31, Devansh Dhar rated it really liked it Jun 02, A rated it really liked it Nov 17, Prasen Paul rated it it was amazing Jun 19, Debalina Ghosh rated it it was amazing Nov 28, Robert Walrod rated it really liked it Jun 14,

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